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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Chartered companies and their role in the development of overseas trade found in the catalog.

Chartered companies and their role in the development of overseas trade

R. Robert

Chartered companies and their role in the development of overseas trade

by R. Robert

  • 276 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Bell .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby R. Robert.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21375006M

In contrast the Dutch West India company chartered by the Dutch government in to carry their conflict for Independence from Spain to Spain's overseas possession. Very successful (little bit navy, little bit trading company). Development and infrastructure began to improve in favour of the local inhabitants until the administration of the Chartered Company was halted following the Japanese Occupation from during World War II. After the war, the township had to rebuilt itself and pick up the pieces. Slow but eventually, the town grew.

Chartered companies were companies that received certain rights and privileges under a special charter issued by the sovereign of a European state. This charter usually gave the company a nationally recognized trading monopoly for a specific geographic area and for specific trade items, and the right to use force to open and maintain trade. CHARTERED COMPANIES. A chartered company is a trading corporation enjoying certain rights and privileges, and bound by certain obligations under a special charter granted to it by the sovereign authority of the state, such charter defining and limiting those rights, privileges and obligations, and the localities in which they are to be exercised.

A corporation is an organization—usually a group of people or a company—authorized by the state to act as a single entity (a legal entity; a legal person in legal context) and recognized as such in law for certain purposes. Early incorporated entities were established by charter (i.e. by an ad hoc act granted by a monarch or passed by a parliament or legislature). Dutch West India Company (Dutch: Verenigde Westindische Compagnie, Dutch pronunciation: [ɣəʔɔktroːˈjeːrdə ʋɛstˈɪndisə kɔmpɑˈɲi] or Dutch: WIC; English: Chartered West India Company) was a chartered company (known as the "WIC") of Dutch merchants as well as foreign investors. Among its founders was Willem Usselincx (–). On 3 June , it was granted a charter for a Founder: Willem Usselincx (among others).


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Chartered companies and their role in the development of overseas trade by R. Robert Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chartered Companies and Their Role in the Development of Overseas Trade [Robert, Rudolph] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Chartered Companies and Their Role in the Development of Overseas TradeCited by: 2.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Scholars from the US, Europe, and Singapore present 11 essays on the development of chartered companies in the 17th century and their role as organizational sites where state and commercial actors negotiated political and economic interests, creating a collaborative framework that increased the capacity of emerging European nation states, merchants, and tradesmen, and expanding the scope of Cited by: 2.

Chartered Companies. Corporations formed through a grant by a sovereign power for the purposes of foreign trade. These companies had Italian origins and became popular among European countries such as Great Britain in the sixteenth and seventeenth century.

The earliest English chartered companies were the Merchant Adventurers (q.v.) and the Merchant Staplers. Such early companies were regulated companies, deriving the principles of their organization from the medieval merchant guilds. The regulated company was a corporation of merchants, each of whom traded on his own account but was subjected to a rigid set of common rules that regulated his.

Another was the Royal Company of the Philippines, chartered to maintain a monopoly of Asiatic trade. The company was chartered several times but never managed to remain profitable for long. The most powerful chartered organization was the Royal Havana Company, established in Tracing their legal history in England, Philip Stern contests the idea that corporations, such as the chartered company, were merely “intermediary bodies or outsourced privatized extensions of the state.” 10 Instead, they were themselves political communities, exercising jurisdiction over territory and trade routes and possessing their own Author: Helen Dewar.

A chartered company is an association with investors or shareholders that is incorporated and granted rights (often exclusive rights) by royal charter (or similar instrument of government) for the purpose of trade, exploration, and/or colonization. Expansion of credit, development of banks, stock exchanges, and chartered trading companies mercantilism policies adopted by European states to promote their citizens' overseas trade and accumulate capital in the form of precious metals, especially gold and silver; strongly discouraged citizens from trading with foreign merchants and used armed.

This outlines the development of companies in Britain, with some explanation of what chartered companies were. Goodall, Francis, T.

Gourvish, and Steven Tolliday, eds. International Bibliography of Business History. London: Routledge, E-mail Citation» Contains numerous entries on specific chartered companies. Hattendorf, John B., ed. In a technical sense, the modern corporation is a chartered company.

Bibliography. See G. Cawston, The Early Chartered Companies, – (, repr. ); R. Robert, Chartered Companies and their Role in the Development of Overseas Trade (). companies, chartered: see chartered companies chartered companies, associations for foreign trade, exploration, and colonization that came into existence with the formation of the European nation states and their overseas expansion.

An association received its charter from the state and sometimes had state support. A great increase in the number and activities of the chartered companies took place during the second half of the 16th century, when the English, French, and Dutch governments were ready to assist trade and encourage overseas exploration.

Changes also occurred in the organization of chartered companies. The significance of Virginia Company can also be traced through its political undertakings.

When the company was first established, the right to make major decisions laid in the hands of those on the council, who were appointed by the King. The truth was that the council in England could not always make the right decision for the colony.

The Chartered Companies in the 19th Century Chartered companies were European trading companies granted. rights (Permission) to perform the administrative role, pacify African territories and carry out trade on behalf of the metropolitan : Ladz. impact of Standard Chartered in Bangladesh.

It follows on from similar studies carried out in on the Bank s impact in Ghana and Indonesia. With this series of reports, among the first of its kind to be produced by an international bank, Standard Chartered aims to move beyond assertion to quantify its impact on the economies where it Size: 6MB.

Trading companies have played a rather prominent role in the development of international trade for centuries. A rather interesting fact, which scholars specializing in trading company development such as Brasch, (), Kim (), Perry (), Balabanis and Baker ()File Size: 1MB. In a technical sense, the modern corporation is a chartered company.

See G. Cawston, The Early Chartered Companies, – (, repr. ); R. Robert, Chartered Companies and their Role in the Development of Overseas Trade (). The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright ©Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. As many companies became engaged in overseas trading in the sixteenth century, an innovative form of chartered company, namely, the joint-stock company came into being as an evolution from the “regulated” chartered companies.

First, their structure minimized commercial and political risks involved in the dynamic conditions overseas, which spread risks and provided incentives to investors in the companies.

The chartered companies in England, whose major precursor being medieval merchant-guilds, were a form of organization that had lawful trading monopolies over certain goods in specific geographical areas as stipulated in the state-granted royal charters.

As many companies became engaged in overseas. Rudolph Robert, Chartered Companies and their Role in the Development of Overseas Trade (London: G. Bell and Sons Ltd., ), [iv] Brian Gardner, The East India Company: A History (New York: McCall Publishing Company, ), Hence, only limited attention has been paid to the SEIC's international role, its relationship with other chartered companies, and to the development of international markets for colonial : Leos Müller.International trade - International trade - Trade between developed and developing countries: Difficult problems frequently arise out of trade between developed and developing countries.

Most less-developed countries have agriculture-based economies, and many are tropical, causing them to rely heavily upon the proceeds from export of one or two crops, such as coffee, cacao, or sugar.